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Learning More About Hearing Loss To understand hearing health and hearing loss, you should first understand how your ear works to capture sound and transmit it to your brain. The outer ear is designed to capture sounds and funnel them into the ear canal. The sounds enter your ear canal, where they cause vibrations in your eardrum. The eardrum has the job of transferring the sound waves from your outer ear to your inner ear. As the sound passes through the inner ear, it vibrates tiny hair cells that represent individual frequencies or pitches. If you think about the inner ear as a piano, some hairs represent the highest notes on the piano, and some represent the lowest. As the various hairs vibrate, it triggers transmission of those frequencies to your brain for interpretation of what sound you have heard. Your ability to hear clearly can be impacted by certain medical conditions, genetics, accidents, prolonged exposure to loud noises, or even aging.
The behind-the-ear (BTE) hearing aid is the type of hearing aid most commonly recommended for infants and young children for a number of reasons, including: It accommodates various earmold types. The earmold detaches and can be easily remade as the child grows. The earmold is easy to handle and can be easily cleaned.
Additional features Some hearing aid optional features improve your ability to hear in specific situations: Noise reduction. All hearing aids have some amount of noise reduction available. The amount of noise reduction varies. Directional microphones. These are aligned on the hearing aid to provide for improved pick up of sounds coming from in front of you with some reduction of sounds coming from behind or beside you. Some hearing aids are capable of focusing in one direction. Directional microphones can improve your ability to hear when you're in an environment with a lot of background noise. Rechargeable batteries. Some hearing aids have rechargeable batteries. This can make maintenance easier for you by eliminating the need to regularly change the battery. Telecoils. Telecoils make it easier to hear when talking on a telecoil-compatible telephone. The telecoil eliminates the sounds from your environment and only picks up the sounds from the telephone. Telecoils also pick up signals from public induction loop systems that can be found in some churches or theaters, allowing you to hear the speaker, play or movie better. Wireless connectivity. Increasingly, hearing aids can wirelessly interface with certain Bluetooth-compatible devices, such as cellphones, music players and televisions. You may need to use an intermediary device to pick up the phone or other signal and send it to the hearing aid. Remote controls. Some hearing aids come with a remote control, so you can adjust features without touching the hearing aid. Direct audio input. This feature allows you to plug in to audio from a television, a computer or a music device with a cord. Variable programming. Some hearing aids can store several preprogrammed settings for various listening needs and environments. Environmental noise control. Some hearing aids offer noise cancellation, which helps block out background noise. Some also offer wind noise reduction. Synchronization. For an individual with two hearing aids, the aids can be programmed to function together so that adjustments made to a hearing aid on one ear (volume control or program changes) will also be made on the other aid, allowing for simpler control.
What types of hearing aids are there, and which is the best fit? hearing-loss-Types-Hearing-Aids Hearing technology ranges from basic amplifiers to advanced digital hearing aids. Hearing aids come in various styles including: behind-the-ear (BTE), receiver-in-canal (RIC), and completely-in-canal (CIC). To determine the best device for you, keep in mind several factors: degree of hearing loss, ear canal size, and your own dexterity.
What causes tinnitus? Scientists and health experts don't know the exact physical cause of tinnitus, but several sources are known to trigger or make it worse, including: Loud noises and hearing loss – Exposure to loud noises can destroy the non-regenerative cilia (tiny hairs) in the cochlea, causing permanent tinnitus and/or hearing loss. Aging – As you age, those same cilia gradually deteriorate, which can lead to tinnitus and/or hearing loss. Ototoxic medications – Some prescription medications such as antibiotics, anti-inflammatories and antidepressants are harmful to the inner ear as well as the nerve fibers connecting the cochlea to the brain. Hearing conditions – Conditions such as otosclerosis and Ménière’s disease are known to cause tinnitus. Health conditions – Tinnitus can also be a symptom of health conditions like cardiovascular disease, hypertension, stress and head injuries.
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