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IN-THE-EAR (ITE) ITE hearing aids are suitable for most types of hearing losses. They are usually small like an eartip and sit in the outer portion of the ear canal. Depending on the size of the ear canal an in the ear hearing aid may be relatively discreet. When you are fitted for an ITE, the shell of the hearing aid is custom-made to fit the shape of your ear. This shell contains all vital electronics and is great for people on-the-go who need their hearing aids to stay in place. The batteries are inserted via a battery door located directly on the hearing aid. They can be easily removed with a small magnetic wand.
Hearing aid styles Hearing aids vary a great deal in price, size, special features and the way they're placed in your ear. The following are common hearing aid styles, beginning with the smallest, least visible in the ear. Hearing aid designers keep making smaller hearing aids to meet the demand for a hearing aid that is not very noticeable.
Open-fit hearing aid is a variation of the behind-the-ear hearing aid with a thin tube. This style keeps the ear canal very open, allowing for low-frequency sounds to enter the ear naturally and for high-frequency sounds to be amplified through the hearing aid. This makes the style a good choice for people with mild to moderate hearing loss. An open-fit hearing aid: Is less visible Doesn't plug the ear like the small in-the-canal hearing aids do, making your own voice sound better to you May be more difficult to handle and adjust due to small part
Completely-in-canal (CIC) hearing aids are the smallest type of hearing aids choices. These hearing aids have good cosmetic appeal and are different from others as they are custom fitted to the inside of your ear canal to amplify sounds in individuals with mild to moderately severe hearing loss.
How hearing aids work Hearing aids use the same basic parts to carry sounds from the environment into your ear and make them louder. Most hearing aids are digital, and all are powered with a hearing aid battery. Small microphones collect sounds from the environment. A computer chip with an amplifier converts the incoming sound into digital code. It analyzes and adjusts the sound based on your hearing loss, listening needs and the level of the sounds around you. The amplified signals are then converted back into sound waves and delivered to your ears through speakers.
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