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What’s the difference between analog and digital hearing aids? Analog hearing aids basically take sounds and make them louder, just as cupping your hand behind your ear amplifies sound. Some analog hearing aids include a programmable microchip, but the functions are relatively basic. Digital hearing aids take in sound waves (in themselves, analog signals, for the tech folks out there), translate them into digital format, process, filter, distort, amplify and ultimately deliver a sound signal into your ear canal that is custom-tailored to your needs. In order to perform all these wonders, digital hearing aids contain a Digital Signal Processor (DSP) chip. To better understand digital versus analog, consider the difference between analog vinyl records and digital CDs. Vinyl records require fairly simple methods for playback, and a simple turntable and needle will do the trick. CDs take a little more hardware, as the digital information has to be processed and reproduced. While there is a greater amount to do, CDs provide clearer, high fidelity sound. Some people prefer the warm crackle of a vinyl record, but that fuzz simply won’t do when it comes to your hearing!
Learning More About Hearing Loss To understand hearing health and hearing loss, you should first understand how your ear works to capture sound and transmit it to your brain. The outer ear is designed to capture sounds and funnel them into the ear canal. The sounds enter your ear canal, where they cause vibrations in your eardrum. The eardrum has the job of transferring the sound waves from your outer ear to your inner ear. As the sound passes through the inner ear, it vibrates tiny hair cells that represent individual frequencies or pitches. If you think about the inner ear as a piano, some hairs represent the highest notes on the piano, and some represent the lowest. As the various hairs vibrate, it triggers transmission of those frequencies to your brain for interpretation of what sound you have heard. Your ability to hear clearly can be impacted by certain medical conditions, genetics, accidents, prolonged exposure to loud noises, or even aging.
How Does A Hearing Aid Work In order to understand things better, you need to understand how a hearing aid works. A hearing aid is a digital sound processor, NOT AN AMPLIFIER, Someone suffering from hearing loss does not need the sound of everything around them to go up, which is what an amplifier does. So this means the person sitting next to you, as well as the crowd around you, is louder. This isn’t going to help you hear better. This is what going to make everything louder. What do you need is a better signal to noise ratio, and this is what hearing aids do…20 times a second. Adding strength to the voices close to you while minimizing the background noise.
What are hearing aids? In its most basic form, a hearing aid is a device that amplifies the frequencies that you have trouble hearing. Most devices nowadays are digital, consisting of a microphone, digital signal processors, amplifiers, and speakers. Hearing technology has undergone a radical rate of evolution in recent years. The introduction of digital signal processing technology has allowed chips to process multiple millions of calculations per second, resulting in unparalleled sound quality. The durability has improved dramatically, and comfort, as well as aesthetics, have been thoroughly addressed. Modern devices have shrunk so much in size that they are barely noticeable.
What Is Tinnitus? Tinnitus (pronounced ti-ni-tis), or ringing in the ears, is the sensation of hearing ringing, buzzing, hissing, chirping, whistling, or other sounds. The noise can be intermittent or continuous, and can vary in loudness. It is often worse when background noise is low, so you may be most aware of it at night when you're trying to fall asleep in a quiet room. In rare cases, the sound beats in sync with your heart (pulsatile tinnitus).
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